5/23/2016

Racehorse Memorial Wall on Twitter

We rejoined twitter to help bring more awareness to the horses. There are tons of horseracing twitter accounts that occasionally report fallen racehorses. Our page is purely about the horses added to the Memorial. Please follow us on twitter and help bring the names of the horses to public attention. Thank you!

5/21/2016

Coincidences

Hardly anything in the universe happens by accident, but occurs through direct intention or neglect, by the choices we make. And life reminds us of this in obvious and uncanny ways. More >>

5/17/2016

Our Criteria for Posting Horses

We are encouraged by the increasing interest in the Memorial, and many visitors have contributed greatly to it. We welcome suggested horses who meet the Memorial’s criteria and are already confirmed (with a source) as deceased when submitted to us. As much as we would like to recognize all horse breeds, this project is limited to the Thoroughbred racehorse or eventer. Purpose and Criteria >>

5/16/2016

Losses at 2016 Grand National: 6

UPDATED: A sixth horse succumbed to complications from an injury at Aintree and was euthanized. See Arzal (FR) on the Memorial.
UPDATED: A fifth horse, Kings Palace (IRE), has perished at the Aintree meet. Four others were fatally injured jumping the infamous Becher’s Brook on the Grand National course. See the Memorial.

5/11/2016

Tell Tale Friend

His name conjures a certain truth: When the racehorses leave us, they leave traces of themselves in the memories of those who are unable to witness a catastrophic injury or death and then forget about it in the next race like it never happened. More >>

5/10/2016

Remember the Racehorses

Holocauste (FR)
Soldiers fall as casualties of war,
and so do the racehorses.
On the turf's battlefield,
some are wounded and
some do not return.
For this reason, remember
the racehorses.

4/29/2016

The 2016 Scottish Grand National

We don’t have to be watching from the sidelines in person to understand that a race like this can’t be fun for anyone (or can it?), least of all the horses. During the chase where less than half the horses finished, Golden Chieftain broke down. More >>

4/21/2016

Oldest Horses on the Memorial

Tigger Too
UPDATED 4/21/2016 (added Trail Guide): Often starting as young as 2 years old, many horses race for their entire lives, for many years, then die in action without the chance for retirement. More >>

4/20/2016

Hidden Racehorse Fatalities

Many times we have reminded that this Memorial (or any other) only scratches the surface of the true death toll. For example, the 8-year-old gelding Brassy Pete (see Memorial) was the 11th horse this season to suffer a fatal injury in racing at Turf Paradise, said the track’s general manager Vince Francia (The Arizona Republic/azcentral, 4/18/2016)—leaving us to ask: Who are the other 10?

4/17/2016

Thank You

Again, thank you for your interest in the horses and to everyone who has contributed to this Memorial, because one researcher cannot possibly cover the entire world’s tracks. Many horses would have gone unnoticed if not for you. So, thank you so much for your help. ~The Editor

4/11/2016

Finally Free

Death is the great leveler. And horses, like humans, must leave the body. They must go where championships, rankings, and earnings no longer matter. At last, they are just horses. But they forever remain in our memories for who they were and what they gave. Now they belong to the cosmos, and always did. Now they are finally free. In Memoriam >>

3/18/2016

Losses at Cheltenham 2016: 7

No More Heroes (IRE)
Seven valiant horses perished during the 2016 Cheltenham Festival. The annual race meeting is a grand event for the players, spectators, and the horses’ connections. But how did things look out on the course as the races unfolded? More >>

3/15/2016

How Tough Does a Horse Have to Be?

The Govaness (GB) Wins at Cheltenham, 2015
Photo credit: Sporting Life
Three horses died today on day one of the 2016 Cheltenham Festival. The horses may love to run, but do they know the danger they face or that this may be their last race? No. Only the humans know that. Here are the three racehorses and what happened in their respective races: More >>

3/13/2016

The Story of Sunloch

Sunloch (GB)
Steeplechaser Sunloch (GB) joins the Memorial and oldest horses pages today. He reminds us that every racehorse has a story to be told. In this case, the horse is celebrated. Sunloch will receive the coveted “green plaque.”
More >>

3/12/2016

For the Racehorses’ Safe Return

Berlin Karlshorst Race Course, 1931
Photo credit: ullstein bild
We send our love and best wishes to all the horses working or competing today. Regardless of rank, every racehorse is engaged in an extreme sport with inherent dangers. So, for every horse who puts his or her foot on the track, we wish you well.

3/05/2016

The Overwhelming Truth

(artist unknown)
This morning I reviewed a couple other racehorse memorials (founded years after this one was) that focus on UK horses and was overwhelmed. More >>

3/03/2016

Fatally Injured Racehorses Ad Infinitum

Admire Rakti (JPN)
For over 10 years the Memorial has tracked fallen racehorses amid the industry's attempts to make racing safer. Surely, no one would like to minimize injuries more than the very industry whose survival depends upon its athletes. More >>

3/02/2016

A Historical Document for the Horses

Mesopotamian Chariot Horse
Since before recorded history, and later depicted in cave drawings and literatures of ancient civilizations, the horse has been here. Across India, the Middle East, the kingdoms of Europe, and the New World, Equus has served in the hunt, wars, farming, transportation, and competitions. More >>

3/01/2016

French Racehorses Underrepresented

Sanctuaire (FR)
Unintentionally, the Memorial does not properly represent French and some other non-U.S. racehorses, because information can be harder to find. 
More >>

2/29/2016

Racehorses Unknown, But Not Forgotten

On the Memorial, unknown soldier is used when a source reported a fatality without disclosing the horses name. Named or not, every horse counts.